Explaining the academic achievement and well-being of adolescent immigrants, refugees, and non-immigrants in Canada

Project number: 
14-080
Approval date: 
Tuesday, March 24, 2015
Principal Investigator: 
Gagne,Monique H
Institution: 
University of British Columbia (UBC)
Funding Agency: 
not grant funded
Datasets requested: 
Medical Services Plan (BC Ministry of Health)
Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) Permanent Residents
Consolidation - demographic (Ministry of Health)
Edudata (BC Ministry of Education)
consolidation - census geocodes
Research objective: 

Part 1 will look retrospectively to explore any within and between group differences in the academic trajectories of immigrants, refugees, and non-immigrants. Part 1 aims to characterize the academic trajectories of young newcomers and ultimately, to identify risks and assets associated with immigration experiences that contribute to positive academic and mental health trajectories. Part 1 will also simultaneously model indicators of social-emotional well-being (namely, mental health services utilization and diagnosis) over the same time frame.

1. How can the academic and mental health pathways of adolescent immigrants, refugees, and non-immigrants be characterized?
2. Does immigration status (immigrant/refugee status) impact the type of academic and mental health trajectory to which a student is characterized?
3. How does age of arrival impact the academic and mental health trajectories of immigrants and refugees?
4. Does gender, age, English language ability, socioeconomic status impact the academic and mental health trajectories of immigrants and refugees?
5. Can gender, age, age of arrival, English language ability, socioeconomic status, or immigration status be characterized as risks or assets in the academic achievement/mental health of young newcomers?
6. What is the relationship between academic achievement and mental health?

Part 1 hypotheses summary: A significant amount of heterogeneity is expected in the academic and mental health trajectories for newcomers (i.e., immigrants and refugees) as well as non-immigrants. It is expected that factors such as immigration status, years in Canada, English language ability, age of arrival, as well as the other demographic fields will serve to characterize the different trajectories of adaptation.

Part 2 will take academic achievement and self-reported indicators of social-emotional well-being (e.g., Depression, Anxiety, Satisfaction With Life, and Self-Worth) and place a closer lens on identifying protective and vulnerability factors, namely, factors related to academic attitudes, social support, and biculturalism.

7. How do Biculturalism, Social Support, and Academic Attitudes impact the academic achievement/social-emotional well-being of adolescent immigrants, refugees, and non-immigrants?

8. How do the risks and assets associated with immigration (identified in Part 1) moderate Biculturalism, Social Support, and Academic Attitudes to impact the academic achievement/social-emotional well-being of young newcomers?

Part 2 hypotheses summary: It is expected that biculturalism, social support, and academic attitudes will all serve to predict the academic and social-emotional well-being for the Part 2 study sample however, it is expected that the model will present a better statistical fit for those who are immigrants and refugees, in comparison to non-immigrants.

Publications: 

Academic thesis or dissertation

  • Gagné, M (2016). Explaining the academic achievement and well-being of adolescent immigrants and refugees in British Columbia (Unpublished doctoral dissertation). University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC
     

Page last revised: December 5, 2017