Cardiac Medication Use Post-Catheterization in Patients Undergoing Coronary Angiography for Suspected Ischemia with Non-Obstructive Coronary Artery Disease

Project number: 
14-090
Approval date: 
Friday, October 3, 2014
Principal Investigator: 
Galway,Shannon
Institution: 
University of British Columbia (UBC)
Funding Agency: 
Not Available
Datasets requested: 
Cardiac Services BC
PharmaNet
Research objective: 

Purpose: To determine the rates of cardiac medication use pre- and post- cardiac catheterization in non-obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD). To determine if there is a difference in major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in non-obstructive CAD patients on cardiac medications compared to those who discontinue/never start medications. The results of the study may change guidelines for medications in NO CAD. Proposed research questions:

Objectives
1. To investigate rates of cardiac medication use 3 months prior to angiography and 3 months and 1 year following clinically indicated angiography for ACS or stable angina in patients with no CAD, non-obstructive CAD and obstructive CAD

2. To examine gender differences in cardiac medication use 3 months and 1 year following angiography in patients with no CAD, non-obstructive CAD and obstructive CAD

3. To examine MACE rates in patients with no CAD, non-obstructive CAD and obstructive CAD at 1 year and 3 years to determine if medication use 3 months post-angiography is predictive of cardiac outcomes at 1 year and if medication use 1 year after angiography is predictive of events at 3 years.

Hypotheses:
We hypothesize that the rates of cardiac medication after catheterization will increase in both groups when compared to baseline; however, lower rates will be observed in the nonobstructive CAD and no CAD patients when compared to the obstructive CAD group. We also hypothesize that there will be lower rates of ACEI, ARB, and statins in women with non-obstructive CAD compared to men. We suspect that 1 year and 3 year MACE rates in non-obstructive CAD patients will be lower in patients using cardiac medications 3 months and 1 year respectively following catheterization when compared to patients not using cardiac medications.


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