Practice patterns among early-career primary care physicians and workforce planning implications: a mixed methods study

Project number: 
19-044
Approval date: 
Tuesday, July 23, 2019
Principal Investigator: 
Lavergne,Ruth
Institution: 
Simon Fraser University (SFU)
Funding Agency: 
Not Available
Datasets requested: 
Not available
Research objective: 

1) Identify what values and preferences, including attributes of clinical work as well as lifestyle and financial
considerations, shape the intentions and choices of family medicine residents and early career primary care
physicians (PCPs).
[Objective 1 will be investigated using qualitative interviews of family medicine residents and early-career
physicians, combined with information from surveys of family medicine residents during, immediately after, and
three years after residency. The main output will be a framework to understand factors shaping practice choice.
The qualitative data will not be linked to the administrative data for this project and therefore will not be discussed
further in this DAR].
2) Compare practice patterns among early-career ( determine if any changes over time reflect cohort effects (attributes unique to the most recent cohort of PCPs), or
period effects (changes over time across all PCPs).
3) Using the evidence generated under Objectives 1 and 2, engage stakeholders (residents, early career
physicians, and policymakers in health workforce planning and primary care) in discussions of practice options,
implications for primary care supply, and promising targets for intervention.
[Under Objective 3 we will complete a scan of available practice options in BC, ON, and NS. We will use
information from the scan combined with results from Objectives 1 and 2 to inform deliberative dialogues with
residents, early career physicians, and policymakers in health workforce planning and primary care. This
objective does not require us to collect any new data (outside of objective 1 and 2), and therefore will not be
discussed further in this DAR].


Page last revised: September 2, 2019