Spring 2015 Coast to Coast Seminar Series - The power of linked administrative health data for population health research: robust data and progressive data analytics

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Population Data BC is hosting the Spring 2015 Coast to Coast seminar series:

“The power of linked administrative health data for population health research: robust data and progressive data analytics”.

Data linkage allows information on an individual from one data source to be linked to information on the same individual from another data source. Using linked data makes it possible to gain a more comprehensive understanding than could be obtained from either data source individually. Data linkage is a particularly valuable tool for health research given the vast amount of information collected by public bodies such as governments, hospitals and health authorities. This data may also be linked to researcher collected data from consenting individuals participating in health research.

The use of administrative health data to support better health outcomes exists across many research areas, for example:

  • Analyzing patient characteristics, treatment costs and outcomes of care to identify the most cost effective healthcare, thereby influencing provider behaviour,
  • Applying advanced analytics to patient profiles (e.g., segmentation and predictive modeling) to identify individuals who would benefit from preventative care or lifestyle changes,
  • Disease profiling to identify predictive events and support prevention measures.

Such research is vital, not only to inform and improve healthcare policy, but also to provide leadership in the innovative use of health data and development of analytic tools and related infrastructures.

This upcoming Coast to Coast Seminar Series on Population Health Research focuses on some of the exceptional work that is currently being done in this field using administrative data. It highlights how cross-sectoral, longitudinal studies of health indicators and progressive analytic techniques can produce outstanding contributions to inform health-related policy-making for healthier communities.

The coordinator of the Spring 2015 Coast to Coast Seminar Series is Ann Greenwood.

Seminar locations

You may experience this event in one of the following ways:

  • In person
  • Via videoconference
  • Via live webcast

Seminar schedule

January 20, 2015

Border Air Quality Study: Does where you live affect your health?

Dr Michael Brauer
Faculty of Medicine, School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia

February 3, 2015

From late effects research to quality care: The Childhood, Adolescent, and Young Adult Cancer Survivor Program (CAYACS)

Ms Mary McBride
Program Leader, The Childhood, Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Survivor Program (CAYACS), BC Cancer Agency

February 17, 2015

The Canadian Partnership for Tomorrow Project: Canada's platform for chronic disease prevention research

Dr John Spinelli
Faculty of Medicine, School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia

March 3, 2015

Quality and costs of end-of-life cancer care: the effect of homecare nursing in three provinces

Ms Reka Pataky
Health Economist and Data Lead, Canadian Centre for Applied Research in Cancer Control (ARCC)

Hsien Seow
Associate Professor, McMaster University, Department of Oncology
Cancer Care Ontario Research Chair in Health Services Research

March 17, 2015

How do I love data? Let me count the ways… Using linked databases for work and health research

Dr Mieke Koehoorn
Faculty of Medicine, School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia

March 31, 2015

What goes up must come down? Primary health care utilization for alcohol-attributed diseases in British Columbia

Ms Amanda Slaunwhite
Post-Doctoral Fellow, University of New Brunswick
Collaborating Scientist, Centre for Addictions Research of British Columbia, University of Victoria

 


Page last revised: May 28, 2015